The House

There was a house at Whitton from very early times however the only remains are the site which is marked by a rectangular moat. There is a lake in front of the house and below it the Horse Wash which is where the wagon-horses would drive through in order to wash their legs.

The existing house is a fine example of the late Queen Anne/early Georgian period and occupies a south-facing position. To the South-west corner is a circular dovecote of the same period as the house, with nest holes for 520 pigeons. The revolving pole with arms for the ladder is still in place as is the leaded cupola on top supported by turned pillars.

The garden at the front is enclosed on either side by a long range of stabling and out-buildings. The west side has a weather vane of wrought ironwork with the inscription of the Topp family who built the existing house in the 18th century. Evidence of the Topp family can still be found in the garden walls with carved initials, and on the wooden summer house where there is a carved wooden finial in the style of the Topp family crest: the victor and the vanquished. In St Mary’s Church in Westbury, visitors can find the Whitton Chapel with tomb of a former Topp.

The interior of Whitton Hall still retains much of the original character. The oak staircase is perhaps the most interesting: the balustrade has three different patterns of balusters and is mentioned in Forrester’s book of Historic Houses. Some of the rooms are panelled and the leaded window on the back stairs is thought to come from the original house. The current dining room was originally the kitchen and has the original inglenook fireplace.

"...the balustrade has three different patterns of balusters and is mentioned in Forrester’s book of Historic Houses"